CROSSBOW SAFETY

CROSSBOW SAFETY

Imagine this...

After an extensive amount of waiting  for that 10pt buck, it is now within your sights.

You’ve been very patient, and all your efforts are about to be rewarded.  You are so focused on this trophy that as you lean forward you lose your balance just a little bit, momentarily forgetting you’re holding a crossbow - not a rifle.

As you fire the trigger, you know the arrow is flying towards the target with a direct hit. 

 

But, you fail to see the arrow hit its mark because all of the sudden...

SEARING pain overwhelms your left hand. 

 

This magical moment that a hunter dreams of, is suddenly marred by the nightmare vision of the top half of your left thumb hanging by a single piece of skin.

Image

Because the hand is so close to the path of the string, there’s a natural hazard when the fingers cross the plane in which the bowstring passes through as it is released.

The 2 most common injuries are to the thumb and index finger.

The speed of that string as it is released has so much velocity and energy that it can severely injure or amputate the digit.

It’s really important to take the time to understand how your crossbow works.

 

A great way to practice safely is by releasing the energy on the string so that there is no rebound to it until you feel comfortable how to load the arrow and repositioning your hand.  This is similar to dry firing a gun.  The internet is filled with instruction videos on crossbow hunting. 

Take your time

safety is worth it

The best way we can care for you, is by sharing our knowledge to help prevent you from having to visit the er or doctors office at all.

Imagine this...

After an extensive amount of waiting  for that 10pt buck, it is now within your sights.

You’ve been very patient, and all your efforts are about to be rewarded.  You are so focused on this trophy that as you lean forward you lose your balance just a little bit, momentarily forgetting you’re holding a crossbow - not a rifle.

As you fire the trigger, you know the arrow is flying towards the target with a direct hit. 

 

But, you fail to see the arrow hit its mark because all of the sudden...

SEARING pain overwhelms your left hand. 

 

This magical moment that a hunter dreams of, is suddenly marred by the nightmare vision of the top half of your left thumb hanging by a single piece of skin.

Image

Because the hand is so close to the path of the string, there’s a natural hazard when the fingers cross the plane in which the bowstring passes through as it is released.

The 2 most common injuries are to the thumb and index finger.

The speed of that string as it is released has so much velocity and energy that it can severely injure or amputate the digit.

It’s really important to take the time to understand how your crossbow works.

 

A great way to practice safely is by releasing the energy on the string so that there is no rebound to it until you feel comfortable how to load the arrow and repositioning your hand.  This is similar to dry firing a gun.  The internet is filled with instruction videos on crossbow hunting. 

Image

Take your time

safety is worth it

.

The best way we can care for you, is by sharing our knowledge to help prevent you from having to visit the er or doctors office at all.

Helpful Tips

1: ALWAYS  read instructions 

All crossbows come with clear and define techniques on how to release the string.  You need thoroughly read the instructions on how to load and release your bow before using.

Taking a few minutes to learn how the crossbow fires the arrow can save you from permanent lifetime disabilities.

When the bow string is set back and strung inappropriately, it can very often misfire while your hand is moving backwards into position as you're adjusting the crossbow to fire resulting in a slice right across the thumb.

THE MOST COMMON THUMB INJURY IS CAUSED BY THE STRING AND THE TENSION.

Helpful Tips

1: ALWAYS  read instructions 

All crossbows come with clear and define techniques on how to release the string.  You need thoroughly read the instructions on how to load and release your bow before using.

Taking a few minutes to learn how the crossbow fires the arrow can save you from permanent lifetime disabilities.

When the bow string is set back and strung inappropriately, it can very often misfire while your hand is moving backwards into position as you're adjusting the crossbow to fire resulting in a slice right across the thumb.

THE MOST COMMON THUMB INJURY IS CAUSED BY THE STRING AND THE TENSION.

2: Wearing Hunters Gloves (CRITICAL)

This is absolutely critical in protecting your hands.  It doesn’t mean if the crossbow fires and hits your hand it won't hurt your hand, but it will significantly reduce the severity of injury.   This could be the difference between losing finger and keeping finger.

2: Wearing Hunters Gloves (CRITICAL)

This is absolutely critical in protecting your hands.  It doesn’t mean if the crossbow fires and hits your hand it won't hurt your hand, but it will significantly reduce the severity of injury.   This could be the difference between losing finger and keeping finger.

3: Weight Distribution

It’s good to know that crossbows are front heavy, whereas rifles are middle or rear heavy.  Thus, you have to learn how to position yourself differently when firing a crossbow to ensure you are able to maintain the right balance and hand placement. 

The support of one of the hands is necessary for safe and accurate shooting.  That hand is placed directly under the arrow groove (typically the non-dom hand).

3: Weight Distribution

It’s good to know that crossbows are front heavy, whereas rifles are middle or rear heavy.  Thus, you have to learn how to position yourself differently when firing a crossbow to ensure you are able to maintain the right balance and hand placement. 

The support of one of the hands is necessary for safe and accurate shooting.  That hand is placed directly under the arrow groove (typically the non-dom hand).

IN CASE OF INJURY

In case of an injury it’s REALLY IMPORTANT to quickly clean the wound with any room temperature water and have a bandage that can put pressure at the wound site to help control the bleeding.

If the bleeding is really bad, it’s always good to have a spare rubber band to put around your finger (like a ring). Once the bandage is on, safely compress the wound to control any bleeding  (it’s important to remove any tourniquet like the rubber-band).

The goal is to preserve blood flow to hopefully save the finger.

If the finger is amputated, follow the same steps first, wash the wound, put bandage on and control bleeding.  Then look for the amputated portion.  Place the finger in a bag of water and place the water on ice.

DO NOT HAVE ICE DIRECTLY TOUCH THE FINGER OR AMPUTATED PIECE. 

It’s very important to bring any piece you may find because the pieces can be used for reconstruction if the finger cannot be replanted.


Did you find this information to be helpful?  Check out our previous blog posts for more!


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Disclaimer: This blog provides general information and discussions about health and related subjects. The information and other content provided in this blog, or in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as a diagnosis or any kind of medical advice,  nor is the information a substitute for professional medical expertise or treatment.

If you or any other person has a medical concern, you should consult with your health care provider or seek other professional medical treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something that you have read on this blog or in any linked materials. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or emergency services immediately.

IN CASE OF INJURY

In case of an injury it’s REALLY IMPORTANT to quickly clean the wound with any room temperature water and have a bandage that can put pressure at the wound site to help control the bleeding.

If the bleeding is really bad, it’s always good to have a spare rubber band to put around your finger (like a ring). Once the bandage is on, safely compress the wound to control any bleeding  (it’s important to remove any tourniquet like the rubber-band).

The goal is to preserve blood flow to hopefully save the finger.

If the finger is amputated, follow the same steps first, wash the wound, put bandage on and control bleeding.  Then look for the amputated portion.  Place the finger in a bag of water and place the water on ice.

DO NOT HAVE ICE DIRECTLY TOUCH THE FINGER OR AMPUTATED PIECE. 

It’s very important to bring any piece you may find because the pieces can be used for reconstruction if the finger cannot be replanted.


Did you find this information to be helpful?   Check out our previous blog posts for more!

RETURN TO TOP
HOME PAGE 

Disclaimer: This blog provides general information and discussions about health and related subjects. The information and other content provided in this blog, or in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as a diagnosis or any kind of medical advice,  nor is the information a substitute for professional medical expertise or treatment.

If you or any other person has a medical concern, you should consult with your health care provider or seek other professional medical treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something that you have read on this blog or in any linked materials. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or emergency services immediately.